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Workforce Development & Continuing Education

Biotechnology Co-Listed Courses

These Biotechnology Courses are Co-Listed with Credit Courses. Please consult the Official WD&CE Schedule for date/times/cost as not all courses are offered every semester.

Please note: Some courses require prerequisite skills or training. Please be sure to check each course description for prerequisites before registering. Failure to have the necessary prerequisites may result is being transferred from the class. Please contact us (see below) with any questions.

WD&CE Official Schedule

BIT 046 INTRODUCTION TO BIOTECHNOLOGY

Course Description: Same as BIOT 110 in the AAS and Certificate Programs This continuing education course is designed for people with a high-school level understanding of mathematics, physics, chemistry and biology and provides instruction on fundamental concepts in Biotechnology as they relate to working in the biotechnology industry. Topics include:   overviews of product development, GLP and cGMP, employer expectations, basic laboratory math and statistics, buffer preparation, handling of equipment and reagents (e.g., enzymes), introduction to experimental design, safety considerations, ethics at the workplace, and introduction to relevant biotech databases available on the Web. PREREQUISITES: High School level mathematics, physics, chemistry and biology. Two hours each week.

Upon completion of this course, the students should be able to:
•  Describe and explain the basic scientific principles of biotechnology such as cells, DNA, proteins, cloning, and PCR
•  Describe and explain the business of biotechnology and describe the development of a biotech product, particularly therapeutics and the different units and functions of a business - R&D, PD, HR, and Finance
•  Describe the role of the FDA and other regulatory agencies in the biotechnology industry - explain the need for the FDA and the concepts of GLP and cGMP
•  Prepare a resume and cover letter toward finding and applying for jobs in the biotech industry

BIT 053 CELL CULTURE & CELL FUNCTION

Course Description:   Same as BT 117 in AAS and Certificate programs. This continuing education course is designed for people with a introductory college level understanding of mathematics, physics, chemistry and biology and provides instruction on eukaryotic cell structure and function and methods of cell culture.  Topics include: an introduction to fundamental methods used to grow animal cells in culture; associated principles of cell structure and function;  aseptic technique; preparation and use of various culture media; cell counting and dilution; maintenance and propagation of cell lines; origin and uses of various cell lines; contamination; cell staining techniques; quality control; survey of metabolism, cell structure and function, growth factors and signal transduction.  Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week. PREREQUISITES: College level Biology and Chemistry or consent of department. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week.
Upon completion of this course, the students should be able to:
•  Complete commonly used calculations in cell culture such as media preparation, cell counting, and cell concentration dilutions and use the results in a laboratory setting
•  Describe and explain the characteristics of mammalians cells grown in vitro
•  Perform routine laboratory tasks in a cell culture laboratory such as cell counting, cell passaging, and cell feeding
•  Record, analyze, and evaluate data related to the growth, maintenance, and evaluation of cell cultures

BIT 054 PROTEIN BIOTECHNOLOGY

Course Description:   Same as BIOT 200 in AAS and Certificate programs. This continuing education course is designed  for people with a high-school level understaning of mathematics and physics and a college level understanding of biology  and chemistry and provides instruction on protein structure and function and methods involving proteins used in the biotechnology industry.  Topics include: an introduction to protein structure and function, primary, secondary, tertiary, and quarternary structure.; eptide and protein synthesis and translation systems for protein production; preservation of protein structure/function; functional assays for proteins including basic principles of enzymology, enzyme kinetics, and binding assays;  strategies and methods of protein purification including chromatographic and electrophoretic techniques; principles of proteomics including peptide mapping and sequencing; diagnostic, therapeutic, and industrial applications of protein products. are discussed. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week. PREREQUISITES: College level Biology, Chemistry and Biochemistry or consent of department. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week.
Upon completion of this course, the students should be able to:
•  Complete calculations that are routinely encountered in a protein lab such as buffer preparation, dilutions, protein concentrations and standard curves, enzyme activity, and specific activities
•  Complete laboratory techniques that are commonly used in protein laboratories such as buffer preparations, dilutions, protein assays, protein gel electrophoresis, functional protein assays, and basic protein purification
•  Explain and describe the characteristics of protein structure and function as they apply to biotechnology, especially in a drug discovery and therapeutic context
•  Record, analyze, and evaluate data routinely collected in a protein laboratory

BIT 055 BASIC IMMUNOLOGY AND METHODS

Course Description:   Same as BIOT 230 in AAS and Certificate programs.  This continuing education course is designed people who have introductory college-level understaning of cell biology and molecular biology and provides instruction on immunology and immulological methods as they are used in biotechnology.Topics include:  brief survey of the components of the immune system and how they interact; B and T cell development, activation and culture; the role of cytokines, their production and purification; signal transduction processes in B-cell activation; the role of MHC complexes, immunoglobulin synthesis and origins of diversity; antigen-antibody interactions; practical aspects of raising and purifying polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies; handling and labeling of antibodies; applications of antibodies including Western blotting, ELISA, and immunohistochemistry Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week. PREREQUISITES: College level Cell Biology, Protein Biotechnology or consent of department. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week.
Upon completion of this course, the students should be able to:
•  Complete calculations that are routinely encountered in an immunology lab such as buffer preparation, dilutions, protein concentrations, standard curves and unknown concentrations, and purification factors
•  Complete routine laboratory tasks common to an immunology laboratory such as buffer preparation, dilutions, protein assays, protein gel electrophoresis, purification of antibodies, Western Blotting, and ELISAs
•  Explain and describe the characteristics of a mammalian immune system and how its components are utilized in biotechnology
•  Record, analyze, and evaluate data routinely collected in a protein laboratory

BIT 056 NUCLEIC ACID METHODS

Course Description:   Same as BT 240 in AAS and Certificate programs. This continuing education course is designed for people with an introductory college level understaning of mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology  protein biochemistry and provides instruction on nucleic acids and methods of analysis of nucleic acids in the biotechnology industry.  Topics include: an introduction to current methods and theory of basic molecular techniques used in the study of nucleic acids; structure of DNA and RNA;  DNA isolation and sequencing; an introduction to genomics and bioinformatics; probe design and hybridization; DNA replication; PCR;  microarrays; RNA isolation; regulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene expression; enzymes used in molecular biology; and principles of cloning including the use of vectors for sequencing and expression. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week. PREREQUISITES: College-level biology, chemistry and protein biotechnology or consent of department. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week.
Upon completion of this course, the students should be able to:

  • Compare gene regulation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes
  • Demonstrate laboratory skills commonly used in molecular biology laboratories such as making solutions, DNA and RNA purification and quantization, agarose gel electrophoresis, use of restrictions and other enzymes, and PCR
  • Describe conceptually commonly-used molecular biology techniques such as DNA and RNA purification and quantization, agarose gel electrophoresis, restriction enzymes, PCR, and microarrays
  • Describe the structure of DNA and RNA
  • Explain how DNA replication and transcription occur
  • Explain what bioinformatics is and give examples of it is used in molecular biology

BIT 057 PRINCIPLES OF BIOMANUFACTURING

Course Description:   Same as BIOT 250 in AAS and Certificate programs . This continuing education course is designed for people with a background in biotechnology including college-level cell biology and protein biochemistry and provides instruction on the basic principles of biomanufacturing.  Topics include: an introduction to the process of producing a biological product using a cell line; production in a simulated cGMP environment; production batch records; upstream and downstream processes; preparation and qualification of growth media and chromatography buffers; the use of bioreactors; QA/QC;  and FPLC protein purification systems. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week. PREREQUISITES: College level Cell Biology, and Protein Biotechnology or consent of department. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week.
Upon completion of this course, the students should be able to:

  • Assemble and run growth vessels for insect or mammalian cells.
  • Assemble and run protein purification equipment.
  • Define the elements of cGMP.
  • Explain downstream processing.
  • Explain upstream processing.

These Biotechnology Courses are Co-Listed with Credit Courses. Please consult the Official WD&CE Schedule for date/times/cost as not all courses are offered every semester.

Contact Us:
  • Dr. Michael D. Smith, Biotechnology Program Director
  • Montgomery College, Workforce Development & Continuing Education
  • 12 South Summit Ave. 4th Floor
  • Gaithersburg, MD 20877

Montgomery College

Montgomery County, MD

240-567-5000

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