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AP Summer Institute: English Language and Composition

AP Institute-English Language and Composition

Instructor: John Corrigan

SYLLABUS: Language and Composition,      Montgomery College


AP Language and Composition: Multi-Day Workshop Itinerary


Presenter: John Corrigan

Tech Needs: Projector and Whiteboard for Attendees to write on

E-mail ahead to suggest a common read -- CITIZEN or CH. 1 of Everyday Use.

Free texts for participants: College Board Workbook for AP Language and Composition, Everyday use: Rhetoric in Our Lives; Seagull Reader: Essays; and Autobiographical Essays by Native American Writers (Modern Library Paperbacks),

GRAMMAR IN PRACTICE: SENTENCES AND PARAGRAPHS and AP LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION (Fitchburg)


Day 1

MORNING

  1. Give Books & Workshop Introduction

    1. Attendance, Introductions, and Materials

      1. Name Tags, School, How long you’ve taught AP Lang for, Goals for the week.


      2. Self-introduction: My teaching and admin experience –– public school, college, independent school

        1. My experience with College Board –– AP reader for Lit and Lang, AP National Conf.

        2. Has anyone served as a reader? Tell us about the experience.Best PD you can do. Serving as a reader = profound influence on my career.

      3. My goals:

        1. Provide information about the Exam, Give you strategies that will help your students on the Exam, and give and receive best-practices teaching ideas.

        2. Provide time to make assignments and syllabus

          1. Is the creation of a syllabus (and reading list) of interest?

        3. Leave with a bank of questions written here to share with each other and our students

        4. Ask questions at any time. Share information.

        5. Share contact info –– make contacts. Collaborate throughout the year.

          1. A friend and I have students write a collaborative essay using Google docs.

        6. A group of professionals coming together to share and gather ideas

        7. Everyday participants should expect to get AP prompts and student essays and a scoring guide. We will score the essays (and you can later do the same with your students).

        8. Lots of group work –– work with new people

        9. Homework –– read and write and discuss


      1. Join the "community” of AP teachers

          1. AP Central (36)

          2. Online Teacher Community (36)

          3. Become a Reader

          4. You’ll see everything and know where your students stand. Contacts / Friends –– share lessons, students co-author papers

          5. Examples of syllabi

      1. Review materials: Google Folder –– don’t remove items; save to your Drive. PLEASE make copies before you change anything.

      2. AP Central Resources

      3. College Board Workbook. Go through College Board Workshop book –– course description.

        1. Read alone.

        2. Discuss in pairs.

        3. Full group.

IV. Book lists (18), course descriptions (10, 11), and teaching strategies.

V. AP English Language and Composition: Expanding Definitions of Argument


THE EXAM

  1. Exam Facts & Course Description and Discussion of the Exam

      1. Look at the 2017 Exam. Review the three prompts students will face.

      2. Groups: What skills does each Q stress? How is this a skills-based exam? What do your kids need to be able to do well?

      3. How to write the PROMPTS? What are they stressing?

          1. Exam stresses important 21st-Century skills. Tony Wagner (The Global Achievement Gap) concepts here –– critical thinking, creativity, synthesis

          2. Plenty of freedom within curriculum


  1. RHETORIC and ARGUMENTATION

    1. Ch. 1 of Everyday Use

      1. Moving away from Char & Theme to Au & Purpose

      2. What is rhetoric?

        1. The sending and receiving of messages –– spoken, visually, written, etc.

        2. Ethos, Pathos, Logos. –– what they are. Ways to stress them? How much terminology is too much?

        3. Rhetorical triangle.

        4. Rhetoric in kids’ lives? (School newspapers, college essays, speeches, conversations, arguments, Snapchat –– visual rhetoric)

        5. Rhetoric as it relates to citizenship


        1. Groups:

          1. Activity on page 7

          2. Deford Example (9)

          3. Activity for Draft article (23)

          4. Rhetorical strategies you see at play here?

      1. Students are asked to go from Character and Theme to Author and Purpose

      2. How to do this with Fiction? In many schools, mandatory book lists require to use fiction to study nonfiction exam.

        1. Thoughts? Texts you use?

BREAK (10:15)


Silent Conversation: “Claudius

    1. Everyone –– text as a political speech

    2. Discuss



"Gay Marriages: Make Them Legal" by Todd Stoddard HANDOUT –– as it relates to Everyday Use

  1. "Tone leads to Author's Purpose" / Appeals: Ethos, Pathos, Logos

  2. Alone: Read and annotate Stoddard

        1. In pairs: SOAPSTone (Speaker, Occasion, Audience, Purpose, Subject, Tone)

        2. What rhetorical strategies does Stoddard use?

        3. How does the Stoddard's language impact the work as a whole?

        4. What is Stoddard's purpose?

        5. Structure here?

        6. Small groups:  Discuss Stoddard's use of rhetorical strategies to achieve his purpose

    1. Full Group Discussion: How Stoddard utilizes the three major appeals (ethos, pathos, logos) and a "ground-up analysis"

      1. Diction and Syntax

      2. Parts of speech

        1. Verbs, Nouns, Clauses,  

      3. Counterargument

      4. Mantra: "Tone leads to Author's Purpose"


“Including Women in the Draft” (Everyday Use 23)

  1. 5-minute essay –– how does the editorial achieve its purpose?

  2. List some topics that would interest your students.


LUNCH

Silent Conversation: “Claudius

    1. Everyone –– text as a political speech

    2. Discuss


  1. GRADING VS. SCORING

    1. Student Writing

      1. Timed vs. Out-of-Class

      2. Fluidity vs. Revision

      3. What's the difference?

      4. Cover Letter HANDOUT: Utilizing Self-Reflection is the Writing Process

      5. How to get into your essay

        1. Modes of Introduction & Voice HANDOUT

        2. 5- to 7-minute essays


    1. What do we mean when we talk about "control of language"? Use Hawkins and Walker.

      1. Discuss nuances of the two examples

      2. What do we look for in student writing?

      3. Strategies for writing a timed essay



  1. GUIDE to Holistic Grading

      1. Using the AP Scoring Guide

        1. Who’s familiar with holistic grading? Differences between holistic and standard classroom grading?

        2. Small Groups: Review and Discuss the Holistic Scoring Guide

        3. Large group: Thoughts? Reactions to the handout?


      1. Things to remember:

        1. Reward students for what they do well.

        2. Timed writing vs. Out-of-class: You are evaluating a rough draft.

        3. Discuss how the annual AP Reading works to put scoring your own students' essays into context.

BREAK (2:30)

Q3 ARGUMENTATION: Everything’s an Argument.


    1. Reasons why I begin each year with Q3 (open argument).

      1. I use this to scaffold the course and the other two Exam Essays.

      2. Example Prompt


    1. What is the Q3 prompt asking students to do? What skills must a student demonstrate?

    2. Review past 5 years’ Question 3


  1. Ways to scaffold this essay:

    1. Tobacco Companies

    2. In pairs: SOAPSTone (Speaker, Occasion, Audience, Purpose, Subject, Tone)

    3. In pairs: Write a rhetorical analysis question based on the essay

    4. Celebrities Prompt

    5. In Pairs: SOAPSTone


Read and score 2007 Q3 essay (Cohen Samples) / Disobedience / Polite Speech

    1. Review question, scoring guide

    2. Score in small groups –– Is there agreement? What makes the upper-range essay an upper-range essay? What lines stood out to you? What aspects of the essay are successful? Where does the essay fall short? Be specific.

    3. See the difference between the 6 and the 9?

    4. Suggestion: Do this with your students. Modeling levels of writing for them.



  1. ACTIVITY: In pairs, write a Q3 specific to your students and their interests or concerns. (I.E.: Transparency in my school’s discipline program.) Please share here.

      1. What makes a good topic/issue?

      2. How much background knowledge do students need on the topic? (40-minute essay vs. Research.)

      3. What role does counter-argument play in a successful essay?

      4. Scaffolding here –– 1) A prompt that requires no research, 2) a prompt that requires research

      5. Write a Q3 that would work with your students.



  1. Day-1 Review & Discussion

    1. Feedback –– more or less (flashcards)


  1. Tonight: Read Nancy Sommers’s essay & Ch. 1 of CITIZEN.




Day 2

Analysis Q2


  1. Warmup: Silent Conversation / 10-min essay


  1. Finish Q3 and peer review: ACTIVITY: In pairs, write a Q3 specific to your students and their interests or concerns. (I.E.: Transparency in my school’s discipline program.) Please share here.

    1. Structure of the prompt?

    2. Goals for your prompt?

    3. Challenges of writing this prompt?

    4. Walk us through yours

    5. Using Google docs, offer feedback on peers’ prompts


  1. Nancy Sommers’ Video

    1. John—you and your colleagues might also enjoy seeing this nine-minute video I made at Bunker Hill College. I asked Bunker Hill students to talk about their experiences receiving feedback and to offer their teachers ideas for giving more thoughtful feedback.  Your teachers might want to ask students about their experiences receiving comments—which comments are effective, which not—and ask them, too, for suggestions about giving more effective feedback. Students love to be asked these questions. Their answers are often instructional and insightful.  Nancy

    2. https://community.macmillan.com/videos/1168 (9 minutes)



  1. Discuss Nancy Sommers’s Essay

    1. Introduction to Q, Q, P (15 minutes):

      1. 1) Write a question about the night's reading.

      2. 2) Write a quote from the night's reading.

      3. 3) Write a 4- to 6-sentence paragraph responding to either #2 or #3.

    2. Small groups: Share your writing

    3. Large group Discussion about Sommers


  1. Group grading - after reading Sommers, comment on student essay.

    1. Prompt

    2. Small Groups. Compare comments. How many questions did you ask? Where are you directive? Facilitative?



BREAK


  1. Silent Conversation Sports Mascots

    1. Annotate Image on the whiteboard and discuss



  1. “On the death of MLK” by Robert F. Kennedy (217)

    1. 5-minute essay: Modes of Introduction & Voice HANDOUT

      1. How does RFK use rhetorical strategies to achieve his purpose?

    2. Small Groups:

      1. Rhetorical Situation?

      2. Tone & Purpose

      3. Tropes & Schemes

      4. Analysis Handout

    3. Pairs: Write a Q2 prompt for the RFK Speech.



ANALYSIS


  1. Review Q2 Prompts from past 5 years.

    1. What to do with terminology?

    2. What is the question asking?

    3. How can we prepare students?



  1. ACTIVITY: Score Banneker, Luce, Hazlitt

    1. Scoring Guide, and Samples

    2. Read and score


  1. TEXT Rendering (STOP ACTIVITY): Read “Letter to .... Pierce” (SEAGULL READER ESSAYS 364). What are the implications after reading the introduction? (Satirical? Authorial right?) How might you approach this with your students?

    1. Alone, write a Q1 or Q2 prompt.

    2. Share with elbow partner.

    3. Large group review.



  1. Write a Q2 prompt for a text you could use in the fall


  1. Citizen Discussion (Ch. 1 @ 2)

    1. Stop Activity (page 8)

    2. Discussion

      1. Reaction?

      2. Analysis (tropes and schemes from the packet)

      3. Ways to use the book? We will create Prompts and share them.

      4. Discussion tracking handouts

      5. Time allowing . . . In Pairs, Write (and share) a Q3 Prompt.


  1. Day-2 Review & Discussion

    1. Feedback –– more or less (flashcards)


  1. Tonight: Ch. 3&4. Write Hazlitt Essay





Day 3

Q3 Synthesis


  1. Saddam Letter in-class analysis –– 5 minutes to plan, 5 minutes to write

    1. Carefully read Mary Ewald’s letter, which led to the release of her son Thomas. How does the author of the letter achieve her rhetorical goals?

      1. You wish to use your planning time to consider the SOAPSTone.


  1. HAZLIT Essay. Participants will write 20-min essay.

    1. Small Groups: What was the experience like? What did you expect? What surprised you? What are we asking our students to do? What does the Exam showcase?

    2. Large group: Debrief the experience.


  1. Hazlitt EXAMPLE ESSAYS


  1. Tweet Nothings. STOP Activity. / Volunteers for fishbowl and we chart the conversation.


  1. Review Q2 from Tuesday. Comment on peers’


BREAK or LUNCH


  1. SILENT CONVERSATION: Lebron and Gisele

    1. Annotate Image on the whiteboard and discuss

    2. 5-minute analysis essay.


SNL “Election Night in America” and write a 5-minute essay examining the video’s use of rhetorical strategies to achieve its purpose.

    What is the Thesis?

How is it achieved? Consider Tone and Dramatic Humor.



  1. Q1 SYNTHESIS: WRITING THE SYNTHESIS ESSAY

    1. Skillset: Why this is valuable. Tony Wagner (the Global Achievement Gap):

      1. “Teaching kids the history of the Electoral College doesn’t prepare them to be more thoughtful voters—or even to want to vote at all” (xvi).

      2. “High school students could be required to take more college-prep and Advanced Placement courses, but would they graduate ‘jury-ready’ as a result?” (xvi).

      3. “In today’s world, it’s no longer how much you know that matters; it’s what you can do with what you know” (111).

BREAK

  1. Silent Conversation with the Text


  1. Review Profile Essay Assignment (HANDOUT)

      1. 8-week activity

      2. Review student examples

      3. Audio Examples


  1. Tulsa Shooting Essay

    1. Student Example


  1. ACTIVITY: Review several synthesis prompts. –– Penny, Advertising, English Language

Facilitate discussion: What are students asked to do?

      1. PARTS of the question?

      2. How are students asked to use sources?

      3. How are citations used? What do they offer student writers?

      4. How are the prompts constructed?

      5. My mantra to students: Make the Prompt your own.

        1. What I mean by this.

      6. Counter Arguments: Why are they important? How can students use them?


  1. ACTIVITY: Read Prompt, Scoring Guide and Student Essay Samples for 3


  1. Citizen discussion –– Write a Q3 or Q2 for Citizen


  1. Alone, list topics that would make good Q1 prompts topics

    1. Texts? Sources?

    2. Review with elbow partners

    3. Large group: Review topics. Goal of these topics?


Tonight: Read Straub (long-ish).


DAY 4


  1. Leap” –– STOP ACTIVITY

    1. Read aloud

    2. Q, Q, P

    3. Fishbowl –– Discussion

    4. In pairs: Write a rhetorical analysis question based on the essay


  1. Synthesis Examples –– Ben Morgan, Whatada, DNA, Patterson

    1. Going beyond the AP

    2. Force the kids to manage multiple texts

    3. What can’t they find on the Internet?


  1. Review Synthesis Questions

    1. Link and link

    2. What is the student being asked to do? What challenges with the student face?


  1. Review 2007 Synthesis Q


  1. Review Straub’s essay.

ALONE: Go somewhere for 10 mins. Write a Q,Q,P: 1) Write a question about the night's reading. 2) Write a quote from the night's reading. 3) Write a 4- to 6-sentence paragraph responding to either #2 or #3.

      1. Large group discussions

      2. Grade a student essay (prompt) in light of Straub’s Essay


LUNCH


  1. Museum walk. 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m.

    1. PAIRS: Take 45 minutes alone, write a description of something in the museum. Then exchange your description. Try to find the piece that matches the physical description.


  1. Multiple Choice:

    1. Uses of MC with students

    2. Inference is crucial here. It's a 21st-century skill. Read clues and figure out what you are being asked. Context clues.

    3. Goal: 70%; 4 or 5 passages = 45% of Exam score. (no points off for wrong answer)

    4. Test students’ close-reading skills: inferences, purpose, rhetorical strategies, meaning (in context), tone, attitude, main idea, citation

    5. Daily short burst (15 Qs in 15 mins) / "Did I teach that?" approach. Many ways to stress close reading –– annotation and analysis.

    6. MC Practice is important.Clock mgt.


  1. Review MC STRATEGIES


  1. 1996 Exam MC section: Participants complete one section in pairs:

      1. Tasks:

        1. What is each question asking you to do?

        2. What type of question is it –– inferences, purpose, rhetorical strategies, meaning (in context), tone, attitude, main idea

        3. EXAMPLE: Two Teams: Take MC section alone (15 Qs in 15 mins). Compare answers with team. Agree on correct answers. T chart on board. Compare against other team. Point to team with correct answer.


  1. How do you approach the MC? How can we use it?

    1. Share Lesson Ideas


  1. Create MC questions about the text of your choice you’d like to use with your students. (Or use Stoddard/Citizen/or Pierce letter from the list above.). Type the passage and five to 10 questions.

  2. Return to prompts.


Tonight: Finish Citizen


DAY 5

  1. SILENT CONVERSATION: Direct TV

    1. What is a rhetorical ladder? Explain the rhetorical ladder used in the commercial and explain which appeal it uses.


  1. MC 14-27 in 13 minutes


  1. Craft 5 MC questions to share.


  1. Visual Rhetoric & Youtube

    1. Review multiple.

      1. Rhetorical Ladders, Irony, Satire

      2. Approaches to visual rhetoric? Do you have an assignment to share?

      3. Can you make it part of a synthesis essay?


  1. Citizen


  1. Fault Lines Harkness Discussion


  1. Books we teach –– share & Q@A


  1. Evals (20 mins.)




Time allowing . . .HOW WOULD YOU TEACH IT: Death of a Moth

    1. In groups, discuss how you might approach the text with students? Prompts? Lesson plans?


CITIZEN to end

AFTERNOON


  1. DISCUSSION of CITIZEN

    1. In pairs, write a prompt for Q3.


  1. Q&A


  1. Wrap-up

    1. Share contact info. AP offers many opportunities to collaborate with teachers outside your school: Students can share documents and write collaborative essays.

  2. Evals and final forms


######



  1. CITIZEN or a reading from SEAGULL READER ESSAYS. Choose a passage and write an analysis prompt.


  1. Tonight: CITIZEN Ch. 4. We will swap books in the morning to review each other's annotations.



Day 4

MORNING


  1. Leap” –– Aloud and Q,Q,P. 1) Write a question about the night's reading. 2) Write a quote from the night's reading. 3) Write a 4- to 6-sentence paragraph responding to either #2 or #3.

    1. Discussion


BREAK


  1. Q 1, SYNTHESIS, continued

    1. Released 2007 Q1 essay (Advertising) Scoring Guide, and Samples

        1. Review Scoring Guide and Student Essay Samples

    2. Utilizing Textual Evidence:

      1. ACTIVITY: Quote Integration Worksheet HANDOUT. Use with Citizen.

        1. Write a thesis to Q2 and imbed two quotes.

        2. Share with neighbor.

AFTERNOON


  1. Finish CITIZEN (Ch. 4 and 5)

    1. Q, Q, P

    2. Write a synthesis (minus the sources) prompt

    3. Take a passage and write an analytical prompt.

    4. Approaches you might take with the book?



  1. HOW WOULD YOU TEACH IT: Death of a Moth

    1. In groups, discuss how you might approach the text with students? Prompts? Lesson plans?


  1. What texts do you teach?

    1. INTERACTIVE: Share your book lists? What works? What doesn't?

    2. Is there a place for fiction?


  1. Wrap-up

    1. Share contact info. AP offers many opportunities to collaborate with teachers outside your school: Students can share documents and write collaborative essays.

  2. Evals and final forms


# # #


  1. ACTIVITY: Choose a mode of introduction and take a position on the topic of Gun control in the US. Write a 4- to 6-sentence intro using a Mode of Introduction.

    AP Instructor John Corrigan Instructor John Corrigan

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