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Liberal Arts and Sciences


View Arts: 045
View International Studies: 152


There are three tracks in the liberal arts and sciences curricula: arts, international studies, and science or mathematics. These tracks are designed for students who plan to earn the bachelor’s degree from the upper division of a college or university or for those who do not plan to enter specific professional training. They stress the ideas and principles of the general fields of learning prior to later specialization in a major field. Completion of all requirements for any of these tracks will lead to the award of the A.A. in arts and sciences.

Electives should be chosen to accommodate the student’s plans for advanced study. Most colleges require that the basic courses in the student’s field of specialization be taken in the first two years as prerequisites for the more advanced courses taken in the junior and senior years.

Majors in biological sciences should include within their first two years at least one year each of chemistry, physics, and mathematics, and zoology or botany the second year.

Majors in economics should include MA 110 and MA 113 or MA 180 and MA 181; EC 103, EC 201, and EC 202.

AC 201 and 202 and/or HS 201 and 202 are strongly recommended for pre-law studies.

Majors in mathematics, chemistry, or physics should include mathematics through calculus.


Arts: 045

Arts and Sciences A.A.

A suggested course sequence for full-time students follows; part-time students should consult an adviser.

General Education Requirements
Foundation Courses
EN 102 Critical Reading, Writing, and Research (ENGF) 3
Health foundation 1-3
  Mathematics foundation 3
Speech foundation 3
Distribution Courses    
Arts distribution 3
HS 151 History of Europe from the Fall of Rome to the 17th Century (HUMD) 3
HS 161 History of Europe from the 17th Century to the Present (HUMD) 3
PS 101 American Government  (BSSD) 3
PY 102 General Psychology  (BSSD)  3
Natural sciences distribution with lab 4
  Natural sciences distribution  3-4
Program Requirements
EN 101 Introduction to College Writing * 3
SO 101 Introduction to Sociology 3
PE 101 - 199 Physical education electives 3
PL 201 Introduction to Philosophy 3
World languages 12
Elective 3
Literature electives† 6
DS elective (optional) (1)
Total credit hours 65-69

* EN 101, if needed, for EN 102 or general elective

† Select EN 201, EN 202, EN 211, EN 212, EN 213, or EN 214.


International Studies: 152

Arts and Sciences A.A.

Revised:  Effective Semester Fall 2012

The international studies track is designed for students who envision a career in the international arena and plan to transfer into the upper division of another college or university with the intention of continuing their studies in such areas as international relations and area studies and subsequently working in this field, be it in government, international organizations, trade, finance, business, or related areas.

All students in this track must see an adviser from the History and Political Science Department and identify as early as possible their transfer institution as well as the particular field or track. The international studies track includes the General Education requirements as well as a number of alternate course choices (listed in the footnotes), which prepare the student for particular transfer options in international studies, such as international relations and area studies.

Students may study abroad for a semester or travel in a foreign country during the summer as part of the international studies track. The international studies adviser will aid students in integrating their studies abroad into the degree program.

A suggested course sequence for full-time students follows; part-time students should consult an adviser.

General Education Requirements
Foundation Courses
English foundation 3
Health foundation 1-3
  Mathematics foundation 3
Speech Communication 3
Distribution Courses    
Arts distribution 3
HS 114 History of The World in the 20th Century  (HUMD)

OR

HS 116 World History:  A Comparative Survey from the Ancient world to A.D. 1500  (HUMD)

OR

HS 117 World History:  A Comparative Survey from A.D. 1500 to the Present (HUMD) 3
  World language
AN 101 Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology* (BSSD)
GE 101 Introduction to Geography (BSSD) 3
  Natural sciences distribution with lab 4
  Natural sciences distribution  3-4
Program Requirements
EC 105 Basic Economics† 3
EN 101 Introduction to College Writing‡ 3
EN 201 Introduction to World Literature I  

OR

EN 202 Introduction to World Literature II** 3
HS 203 Latin American History

OR

HS 207 East Asian Civilization

OR

HS 208 Modern Asia 3
PL 201 Introduction to Philosophy †† 3
PS 101 American Government 3
PS 121 Political Ideologies  

OR

 
PS 250 Introduction to International Conflict Resolution 3

OR

   
PS 282 Politics of the Developing World 3
PS 203 International Relations 3
PS 201 Comparative Politics and Governments 3
  World language 3
Total credit hours 62-63

* Alternates: AN 206, EC 103, EC 105, PY 102, SO 101.

† Alternates: AN 206, EC 201, GE 102, GE 103, GE 104, GE 201, PS 121, PY 102, SO 105.

‡  EN 101, if needed, for EN 102/109 or general elective

** Alternates: EN 122, EN 208, EN 215, HS 205, HS 214, third world language course.

† † Alternates: HS 203, HS 207, HS 208, HS 210, a third or fourth world language course. 

Program Outcomes for the International Studies A.A. Degree

Upon completion of this program a student will be able to:

  • Differentiate among functions of various types of international political actors: states, multinational corporations, nongovernmental organizations, intergovernmental organizations, etc.
  • Articulate the cultural, ideological, historical, religious, and philosophical contexts of current political systems and controversies.
  • Analyze the impact of globalization on economic, political, and cultural institutions.
  • Highlight key international geographic boundaries (physical and political).
  • Explain the historic and contemporary consequences of linguistic barriers for cross-cultural dialog and diplomacy.
  • Identify potential career options in the field, international research questions, strategies for global activism, and opportunities for expanding cross-cultural interaction.
  • Compare the costs and benefits of varying social, economic, and political structures.

Refer to course description pages to identify courses with prerequisites.
Courses in italics meet General Education requirements
.


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