Skip to Main Content
History And Political Science

History & Political Science Department

Rockville Campus

History

History courses are taught on all three campuses. Because of its size, the greatest variety of history courses are offered here at the Rockville campus. There are eight full-time members and a variety of adjuncts. 



Fulltime Faculty


 Lee AnnisDr. James Lee Annis joined Montgomery College in 1986 and has taught at all three campuses. Currently Associate Professor of History at the Rockville campus, he grew up in Rockville, attended Montgomery County Public Schools, graduated from Hanover College (IN) and received his M.A. and Ph.D. from Ball State University. He is the author of Howard Baker: Conciliator in an Age of Crisis and with Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, Tennessee Senators, 1911-2001: Portraits of Leadership in a Century of Change.

 

 

 

 



Dr. Mary Furgol

Dr. Mary Furgol grew up in Fife, Scotland. She earned a Ph.D. in history at the University of Edinburgh, after completing her M.A. there with First Class Honors and graduating with distinction in history and religious studies education from Craiglockhart College of Education.  Dr. Furgol's dissertation focused on the problems of poor relief provision in an early industrializing society.  She has taught at American University and Mount St. Mary's College and has taught full-time at Montgomery College since 1992.  During that time she chaired the History and Political Science department for nine years and has conducted a number of travel study tours to Scotland, Ireland and England.  She has contributed to a book of critical essays on Thomas Chalmers and given several lecture series in the Smithsonian Campus on the Mall program.  In 2002 she received an NEH grant on the topic of Cities in a Comparative Cultural Context, the results of which were published in the spring of 2004. Currently she is director of the Montgomery Scholars Program and Chair of the department.  She has taught modern world history, European history, British history, the History of Ireland, the History of Scotland and Western Women's History, as well as running Honors seminars on Nazi Germany and the Holocaust, Victorian Women, and the History of Medicine.


Dr. Jorge Hernandez-FujigakiDr. Jorge Hernandez-Fujigaki holds a Ph.D. in History from the University of Chicago. He has taught college-level courses in the fields of U.S. History, Latin American and Latino History at several American universities -- Northeastern Illinois University, Wayne State University and Michigan State University. He was also an Associate Professor at the College of Border Studies (Colegio de la Frontera Norte) in Tijuana, Mexico, a premier research institution devoted to the analysis of the most critical U.S.-Mexico binational issues, i.e., illegal immigration, trade, and identity.  He joined MC three years ago, where he has taught courses on U.S. history, Afro-American history and Latin American history.

 

 

 


Dr. Michelle Moran

Dr. Michelle Moran earned a Ph.D. in history and a graduate certificate in women’s studies from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.  She taught courses in U.S. history, gender and sexuality, medical history, and U.S. foreign relations at the University of Nevada in Reno before coming to Montgomery College in 2007.  Since arriving at the college, she has offered classes in the history of the United States, the 20th-century world, and western women.  Dr. Moran is the author of Colonizing Leprosy:  Imperialism and the Politics of Public Health in the United States (University of North Carolina Press).

 

 

 

 


Dr. John RiedlDr. John Riedl grew up moving between Maryland and Virginia and earned an associate’s degree from Virginia Western Community College.  He transferred to the University of Virginia, where he earned his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees, and, in 2006, his Ph.D.  Before joining the History and Political Science Department at MC in 2006, Dr. Riedl was an Assistant Professor at St. Louis Community College, where he taught for five years.  Here at MC, he teaches courses in U. S. History, African-American History, and Civil Rights in America.  He is also developing a Learning Community course with a colleague in Sociology, which will hopefully be offered in Spring 2009.

Dr. Riedl’s dissertation, Language and Racial Identity in Nineteenth-Century America, analyzed the uses of racial language in the contested debate over the identity of people of African descent.  He is currently revising it to be submitted for publication.  Dr. Riedl’s research and teaching interests include slavery, race relations, civil rights, Native American history and labor history.


Dr. Alonzo SmithProfessor Alonzo Smith was born and grew up in Washington, D.C. and he remembers when schools and public facilities in Virginia, the District and Maryland were segregated.   He earned his Bachelor’s degree from Georgetown University, his Master’s from Howard University, and his doctorate from UCLA.  Before coming to Montgomery College he taught in California, Nebraska, and Virginia.  He has lived a total of four years in Africa, three in the Republic of the Ivory Coast, and one in Sierra Leone.  Among the African nations he has visited are the Congo and South Africa.  He has been employed as a social worker for the Urban League of Nebraska, and he served from 1991-92 as project director for a USAID project for war-displaced people in Sierra Leone.  From 1994 to 2005 he was a program researcher and curator at the Smithsonian Institution’s National  Museum of American History.  He was one of two curators for the museum’s observance of the fiftieth anniversary of the Supreme Court’s school desegregation decision, entitled “Separate Is Not Equal: Brown v. Board of Education.” He is married, with two grown children, and lives in Rockville.   Professor Smith teaches African American, United States, and African history, and his research interests are in the field of recent African American history.


Professor Joseph StumpfProfessor Joseph Stumpf is a native of Chapel Hill, North Carolina and a devoted Tar Heel.  He earned a Bachelor’s degree in Classics at UNC-Chapel Hill with a specialty in Classical Archaeology, a Master’s at the University of British Columbia, also in Classical Archaeology, and a PhD from the University of Missouri at Columbia, awarded in Art History and Archaeology, with his dissertation written on the socio-economic phenomenon of tourism in the ancient world, especially in Greece under the Roman Empire.  Professor Stumpf has studied abroad on fellowship in both Greece and in Jordan and has extensive archaeological experience derived from work in North Carolina, Arizona, Italy, Jordan and Greece.  He has taught as an adjunct professor at The George Washington University and Howard University and at Montgomery College in both the Art Department and the History and Political Science Department.  He was hired as a full time member of the History and Political Science faculty in 2005, specializing in ancient and medieval western history.

Courses offered by Professor Stumpf include HS 116 (World Civilization to AD 1500), HS 120 (History of Technology and Western Civilization), HS 151 (Western History from the Fall of Rome to the 17th Century) and HS 186 (Ancient Western History).

Thematic research interests include the history of travel, tourism and pilgrimage, and military, technological and religious history.  Area interests include the Classical Civilizations of Greece and Rome, as well as the Ancient Near East.


Professor Shuping WanProfessor Shuping Wan grew up in Shanghai, China.  Due to social obstacles he never got an opportunity to go to college.  While working as a carpenter he taught himself in the library, and was later awarded a B.A. in English literature by Shanghai International Studies University.  He received his M. Ed. and M.S from Northern Illinois University, and completed all the four fields of his doctoral course work (modern Asia, modern Japan, Asian Americans, and Latin America) at Duke University.

Prof. Wan was visiting lecturer at Northwestern University and Texas A&M University before he joined MC faculty in 1998.  He teaches East Asian Civilization, Modern Asia, History of Asian Americans, World in the Twentieth Century, and Women in World History.  Prof. Wan’s research interest is radicalism and alternative modernities.  His publications include reviews, essays, and translations.  He is currently translating Edward Bellamy’s Looking Backward 2000-1887 into Chinese.

He loves Russian music and French literature.  Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No. 1 is a source of his inspiration, and Romain Rolland’s Jean-Christophe is one of his bibles.

Office: HU 268
shuping.wan@montgomerycollege.edu
Phone: 240-567-5024



Adjunct Faculty


James Perry

Mark Saintangelo

Professor Thomas Elkin Taylor has been an adjunct professor in the Department of History and Political Science at Montgomery College – Rockville since 1995. He has also taught undergraduate and graduate students at George Washington University and juniors and seniors at the Universities at Shady Grove. He has taught courses in the fields of modern world history and the modern history of Europe, of Latin America and of Europe.

Taylor was in the Foreign Service of the United States for more than 29 years, retiring from the Senior Foreign Service in 1987. He served in diplomatic missions in Luanda, Angola; Buenos Aires, Djakarta, Panama, Paris, Brasilia and the Department of State. In 1975-76 he was a Congressional Fellow of the American Political Science Association.

Before entering the Foreign Service he was a reporter for the Atlanta Constitutionand served in the U.S. Army. He received his A.B. in history and Masters in political science from Emory University in Atlanta and his PhD in history from the University of Virginia (1995).

Taylor is married and lives in Bethesda. He has three grown children and four grandchildren.



Former Faculty


Ruth Dinbergs


In Memoriam


Duane Ellison

Jim CroninJim Cronin served on the faculty of Montgomery College for 36 years, from 1970 until his retirement in 2006.  He passed away on April 26, 2011, at the age of 69.

Born in Queens, N.Y., he studied at Bellarmine College, a seminary for the Jesuit order in Plattsburg, N.Y., but left before taking his final vows.   A longtime  civic activist, he was a member of the Montgomery County Board of Education during the 1980s.  In 1982 he was one of four progressive candidates for the board who successfully ousted a conservative majority.  His tenure of the Board lasted until 1990, including two terms as president. 

A champion of busing to achieve racial integration, he courageously and consistently advocated for this policy, sometimes at the expense of his own personal safety.  Faced with difficult  issues such as school closings and racial integration, the school board meetings were frequently so contentious that police protection had to be provided.  Prior to his service on the Board of Education he was a member of the County Human Relations Commission, and he advised the Board and other governmental agencies on matters of racial and gender equity.   His work on behalf of human rights earned him an award from the United Nations Association.

Jim served twice as chair of the History and Political Science Department, from 1988 to 1992, and again from 2002 to 2005.  The winner of several awards for his contributions to the College, he was recognized for outstanding faculty performance in 2005

In 1966, he earned a bachelor’s degree from Fordham University in the Bronx, and in 1973 a doctorate in history from New York University.

Among his other community contributions was the presidency of Hexagon, a nonprofit organization that is now in it’s 56th year.  As the Washington area’s only original political satirical comedy revue, it produces performances, the proceeds from which are donated to charitable organizations such as Hospice Caring, Inc.     Jim also narrated “Voices from the Tomb”, a documentary, produced in 2004 by Montgomery College Television.  The video is about guards at Arlington National Cemetery’s Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

In retirement, he worked with Doug Owsley, a forensic anthropologist and curator with the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History, on a project entitled Written in Bone.  This exhibition illustrated the ways that historians learn from human remains that have been excavated from historical sites.  These sites included Jamestown, Virginia, St. Mary’s City, Maryland, and the Lost Towns area along the shores of the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland.  He furnished contextual historical information on seventeenth century England and the North American colonies.  This exhibition will be available at the National Museum of Natural History until January 6, 2013.

Jim is survived by his wife of 20 years, Barbara Levine Cronin of Silver Spring; a daughter from his first marriage, Stephanie Cronin of New York; two stepchildren, Ilene Frank of Albany, N.Y. and Brian Frank of New Hartford, N.Y.; and two grandchildren.

In the History/Political Science Department, we remember Jim for his keen wit and gentle Irish humor.    Barbara has summed up his life better than any us when she wrote;  “One thing that has meant a great deal to me over the past months is hearing from people who knew Jim as a teacher at the college.  There are many who have taken the time to contact me to share their views on him as an outstanding educator and caring person.  In my contacts with the people at the college, I can only comment that Jim is simply a representative of the culture of Montgomery College as an institution of learning.  He was very proud of his association with all of you as he thought you were the best.”

          Photo Gallery
Jim Cronin photo gallery 

 

Washington Post article

 



Montgomery College

Montgomery County, MD

240-567-5000

©2014, Montgomery College